Aquaponics Digest - Wed 10/27/99




Message   1: Technical greenhouse question

             from "sbyte" 

Message   2: Active Greenhouse

             from "Barry Thomas" 

Message   3: Re: cold

             from 

Message   4: Re: Strawberries????

             from S & S Aqua Farm 

Message   5: Re: Active Greenhouse

             from "Barry Thomas" 

Message   6: Horizontally integrated aquaculture

             from Stuart Bunting 

Message   7: Re: Technical greenhouse question

             from Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta

Message   8: Re: Strawberries????

             from Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta

Message   9: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  10: Re: Power Conservation

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  11: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  12: Re: Technical greenhouse question

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  13: Re: Power Conservation

             from Dave Miller 

Message  14: Re: Power Conservation

             from Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta

Message  15: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from PDOSSJR

Message  16: Bananas

             from Peggy & Emmett Hoebel 

Message  17: RE: Heirloom bananas

             from "Ronald W. Brooks" 

Message  18: Re: Power Conservation

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  19: Re: Power Conservation

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  20: Re: Power Conservation

             from Dave Miller 

Message  21: Re: Power Conservation

             from Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta

Message  22: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  23: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  24: Re: Power Conservation

             from "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Message  25: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from PDOSSJR

Message  26: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

             from PDOSSJR

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 1                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Technical greenhouse question

From:    "sbyte" 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 00:23:10 -1000

>

> 1.  Can hoop structures be retrofitted to allow some

> passive convection

> ventilation, avoiding the need for fans and cooling for at

> least some of

> the year?  I've seen some advertisements for commercial

> hoop structures

> with what appears to be a vented hoop which lifts up from one side,

> almost creating a sawtooth effect.  Or can you put in some

> central ridge

> venting?

The greenhouses I'm running have are Gothic type.  They have been

retrofited using wood.

to create a vent all along the top ridge.   It is a permenate opening

with a screen.   So, it

takes two pieces of plastic.  And the screen has to be installed

before you put on the second

piece of plastic.

  A six foot piece of 1x1 is attached at the peak , so about three

feet sticks out and 2 ft above.  A faica board is

then attached on the end of them.

  I'll have to try an get a photo scaned latter.

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 2                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Active Greenhouse

From:    "Barry Thomas" 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 12:53:18 +0100

Rob, Marc and all,

I have got somewhat behind with my mail - sorry for the delay.

Some aspects of this idea came up a while ago but as my last post on the

inflation fans thread seemed to cause confusion I am giving a brief

description of it here so that we're all definately thinking about the

same thing. Will respond to the points not covered by this as soon as

possible.

The hope is that these modifications (or something like them) will help

provide better growing conditions at reduced energy and water cost. The

reduction in airflow through the GH should also make other enhancements

such as low humidity, CO2 enrichment etc easier/possible.

The basic structure is just a twin-wall poly tunnel. It does not have an

exhaust fan. There is an inflation fan which introduces air into the

envelope void at one end of the tunnel (the front, say).The fan is

chosen to produce enough pressure for a ridgid envelope and enough

volume to change the interior air at the rate required by the plants

needs for fresh gases and waste removal. The air from the inflation fan

moves down the length of the structure, between the two skins until it

reaches the other end where it is exhausted (at the appropriate rate to

maintain envelope pressure) into the tunnel interior. The air then

travels back along inside the GH, bringing fresh air to the plants and

carrying off waste gases before exiting the tunnel near the front end.

Some measure of heat exchange will occur between incoming/outgoing air.

Even better tracking (and further independence) of airflow and inflation

demands should be achieveable by placing powered butterfly or gate

valves at both envelope to interior exhaust and interior to exterior

exhaust. These valves are fairly simple things and only use power when

changing state. Their overall value (including power saving) easily

outweighs their cost.

The active heat sink. (Stole the basic idea for this from Mike Comets

post to this list regarding temp control of fish tank but could be

common practice for all I know) There are only three main components.

The first is a long loop of water-filled hose distributed around the

interior of the GH. This has a small tank inline at a convenient place

and a pump to circulate the water around the loop. The second - the sink

itself - is a fairly large,

well-insulated tank of water, (probably) located outside the GH. The

third component is a bi-directional heat pump - most easily obtained

(for experimental purposes anyway) from a couple of air-conditioning or

freezer units. As these work in one direction only, two are needed. One

has its cooling coil submerged in the small tank in the GH loop and its

warm coil/radiator submerged in the external sink tank to move heat from

the GH loop to the sink. The other is the same but the other way around

to trasfer heat from sink to GH. Both together can be treated as a

single, two-way heat pump.

As Rob said, when temp differentials are small, heat transfer is slow

and inefficient. The pump of an active heatsink should allow it to

maintain much larger differentials. When cooling is required, heat is

rapidly transferred from GH loop to sink. The large temp diff between GH

loop and internal air should result in more efficient heat transfer for

air to loop, independent (to some extent) of heatsink temp. Heating is

accomplished/aided by pumping heat stored in the sink back to the GH.

When the pump is switched off, heat is unable to transfer in either

direction whatever the difference in temps. As the "saturation" temp of

the sink is likely to be much greater than ambient temps, any excess

heat can be wasted to the atmosphere by a relatively small radiator

(fan-assisted or use some exhaust from GH).

So, the exhaust fan which previously had the dual purpose of providing

adequate fresh air intake and reducing maximum temps is removed. Air

intake is now provided by the inflation fan, this seems to match well

with it's other purpose. The heatsink (along with a heater for cold

weather - this could itself be part of the sink) takes on the task of

thermal

management which it can now do without affecting - or being much

affected by - anything else (although it seems possible that the GH loop

could act as dehumidifier/water recovery?).

An additional water recovery unit at the final GH outlet (hopefully now

possible due to greatly reduced airflow) using a heat exchanger cooled

by another heat pump could help to further pay for its running costs if

the warm output from the pump also goes into the heatsink so you grab

back some of the heat from the outgoing air as well.

Another cost saving possibility which makes use of the external sink is

that during cold periods, a few small, cheap wind turbines (or whatever)

could dump their output into the sink via electric heater coil, adding

energy to the system while avoiding need for extra batteries,

regulators, controllers etc.

I'm only suggesting this approach as a basic core which might allow

better/easier integration between subsystems and give the controller

greater scope to manipulate the structure and the energy it contains

without sacrificing too much of the protection you wanted from the GH in

the first place. Changes and additions will of course be needed to suit

particular needs.

As I say, this post is intended to help explain a previous one but any

thoughts/corrections anyone has about individual points or the whole

idea will be gratefully received.

Barry

barrythomas@crosswinds.net

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 3                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: cold

From:    

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 8:00:09 + 5 EST

Live and run a system in upstate NY - lots of heavy lake effect snow and

cold temps - no problems, as long as 

you live by the manual!

Mike

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 4                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Strawberries????

From:    S & S Aqua Farm 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 07:27:55 -0500

At 08:35 PM 10/26/1999 +1000, Robert wrote:

>       I have just purchased a flood and drain system for strawberries

>       and I wish to place this into my aquaculture system.

>

>       Does any one have advice, mainly on the side of applying

>       the additional nutrients (iron, calcium, etc.) The other

>       area which needs to be addressed is the PH - my fish stock

>       is around 7.5, and strawberries prefer 6.5, any ideas????

Robert, is this system a "standard" hydroponics system that you're going to

add to your aquaculture set-up?  If so, I can't be much help; but we did

have success with strawberries in our gravel bed aquaponics system.  Our

incoming water pH is 7.3, and the strawberries were a variety of

June-bearing.  Because we'd heard that they would not produce without

additions, we were not especially hopeful when we tried them; but were

pleasantly surprised that they did produce.  Of course, this is probably

just one more example of our desire to trial everything ourselves instead of

always taking the word of "experts".    

It's probable that the gravel/bacterial action itself has some affect, and

so I wonder if you couldn't modify your system somewhat.  What components

are in your flood and drain system, space allocated, are you recirculating

back to the tanks?

It's always fulfilling to be able to produce part of the family's food

supply, but it's absolutely thrilling to produce strawberries in January in

Missouri -- almost feels "decadent" to be eating fresh berries with snow on

the ground.

Paula

S&S Aqua Farm, 8386 County Road 8820, West Plains, MO 65775  417-256-5124

Web page  http://www.townsqr.com/snsaqua/

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 5                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Active Greenhouse

From:    "Barry Thomas" 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 15:51:46 +0100

> Rob, Marc and all,

Sorry Ron - the kind of typing error that's easy to miss but should have

caught it anyway.

Barry

barrythomas@crosswinds.net

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 6                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Horizontally integrated aquaculture

From:    Stuart Bunting 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 16:32:57 +0100

Dear List members,

I would like to invite you to participate in a Delphi investigation

regarding the management of wastewater from aquaculture. The study aims to

focus on the potential of horizontal integration as a management strategy

for wastewater from commercial aquaculture. The term "horizontally

integrated aquaculture" is used here to describe culturing aquatic species

in the wastewater from commercial aquaculture, reducing the concentration of

pollutants and potentially conferring benefits to the operator, environment

and stakeholder groups. Examples include the culture of seaweed and

shellfish in the wastewater from shrimp ponds and marine cage facilities and

the use of constructed wetlands planted with reeds or mangroves to treat the

wastewater from landbased freshwater of marine/brackish aquaculture,

respectively.

If you would like to take part in this study please reply to me personally

(swb1@stir.ac.uk). I hope that the results of this study will help focus

interest and resources on high potential systems, and that the publication

of results will help raise awareness of horizontally integrated aquaculture,

including the real world constraints to developing these systems and their

potential.

Yours sincerely,

Stuart Bunting 

PhD student

Institute of Aquaculture

University of Stirling

Stirling

Scotland

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 7                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Technical greenhouse question

From:    Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 12:18:14 -0400

That's pretty much what I had in mind.  It may work better with a gothic

structure since the angle of the roof is steeper.  I would think that

this angle would faciltate air flow up and out.  In contrast, a hoop

structure might trap heat in the gentle curve of the roof.  Still, I

would think some venting would be better than none. On the other hand,

if simply replacing one end wall with screen is sufficient to equalize

indoor and outdoor temperatures this may be a simpler solution.

> > 1.  Can hoop structures be retrofitted to allow some

> > passive convection

> The greenhouses I'm running have are Gothic type.  They have been

> retrofited using wood.

> to create a vent all along the top ridge.

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 8                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Strawberries????

From:    Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 12:39:20 -0400

Hi Robert,

I just came across the information that you requested.  The USDA

conducted strawberry research using trout effluent at its Appalachian

fruit Research Station in West Virginia.  Dr. Fumiomi Takeda

(ftakeda@afrs.ars.usda.gov) sent me his complete report.  On the issue

of nutrients it states:

"Since nutrient concentrations in aquaculture effluent were about 15% of

the levels measured in commercial nutrient solution the following

nutrients were supplemented (mg/l):  NO3-N(18), P(0.7), K(5), Ca(55),

Mg(20) AND s(9) and all micronutrients."

In another part of the report he states:

"  Since many nutrients were low the following nutrients were added to

aquaculture effluent:  0.1 mg/L Fe-EDDHA (LibFer SP, Allied Colloidals,

Inc., Suffolk, VA), 0.10 mg/L Mn-EDTA (Librel Mn,  Allied Colloidals,

Inc., Suffolk, VA), 15.0 mg/L K (K2SO4), and 0.0044 mg/L Mo

[(NH4)6Mo7O24).  Granular micronutrients (Sierra Chemical Corp,

Milpitas, CA) (2.0 g/pot) were applied monthly)."

There was no mention in the report of any adjustments to the pH of the

incomeing effluent, which was 7.2.  They also brought bumblebees into

the greenhouse for germination.

Adriana

> >       I have just purchased a flood and drain system for strawberries

> >       and I wish to place this into my aquaculture system.

> >

> >       Does any one have advice, mainly on the side of applying

> >       the additional nutrients (iron, calcium, etc.) The other

> >       area which needs to be addressed is the PH - my fish stock

> >       is around 7.5, and strawberries prefer 6.5, any ideas????

>

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 9                                                           |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 13:10:25 -0600

> I will assume you are getting 115V and 230 V from your

> leased PV system and you may not modify it nor is DC power

> available to you. Please correct me if my assumptions are

> off as a direct DC connection may give further energy

> savings.

>

Thanks for the response Marc.  No, it's more like a lease to own deal, and

we can tap it anyway we want, including DC.  It's a 48 v dc system, and

includes 2 trace 48 v inverters for AC.

> Are you running your pumps in the most efficient part of

> their curve? I typically will find a beautiful 75 to 90 plus

> percent capable system running at 25 to 50 percent or worse.

>

Sorry, I don't understand what that means.  We were planning on using the

sears pumps S&S recommends, and finding a timer that would let us run  it

once an hour to flood the beds, then use a larger tank for the bed drain, so

the return would be less frequent.

> Did you select an efficient or the most efficient pump,

> manufacturer or model for your application?

>

Tom said he's tried a lot of pumps, many of which failed, so we were going

to stick with the sears AC pumps, which is a less efficient way to go, but

perhaps more reliable.

> Did the wiring design take into account motor start up

> surges that may take 3 to 8 times the starting current than

> normal running current?

>

We were hoping to find an accurate enough timer so we could "time" each node

differently, so we wouldn't have a multiple load of pumps turning on at the

same time.

> Intelligent motor controllers can be used to run a pump or

> blower motor. If properly selected and setup they can

> provide significant efficiency gains over a direct hook-up.

> A major public electric utility in the Denver, CO area was

> giving major rebates to companies that added motor

> controllers to the air conditioner, pumping and other plants

> AND the controllers and labor did NOT come from the utility.

> This was cheaper than adding generating capacity.

>

I'd like to know more about the intelligent motor controllers!

> There are Freon operated shutters that automatically open in

> sunlight and close towards dark without electricity with the

> purpose of automatically insulating your structure.

Where do you get those?

> Passive heat collection schemes abound that use vertical

> elevation distance to cause air and coolant flow by

> convection rather than pumps or blowers.

I'd love to hear details.

>

> All appliances in your home are not created energy

> efficiency equal.

We have a watt meter that we've tested all appliances with, and are going

with LED and florescent lights.

>

> My cat has a cold and sneezed on me. Gross.

>

Try hooking it up to 220 volt AC.  It should stop the sneezing.

> Marc

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 10                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 13:12:01 -0600

Dave, you're a drummer?  Where?

> A remodeler, drummer, Kindred Spirit...

> 

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 11                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 13:14:08 -0600

> go. Also, unless you have a huge array, they are necessary for battery

> equalization that must be done every month or two. There is a lot to know

> about deep cycle batteries to get the most life out of them. A regular

> generator is really over kill for battery charging since the deep cycle

> batteries should only be charged between 10-20% of their amp hr rating.

>

> Paul

Are you familar with the Absolite II batteries?

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 12                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Technical greenhouse question

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 13:21:34 -0600

I don't think there's going to be much different between a gothic and an

arch as far as venting, but the arch will be much stronger in a hurricane,

which could be an issue in your area. The arch is probably the next

strongest thing to a dome.

Jewel

> That's pretty much what I had in mind.  It may work better with a gothic

> structure since the angle of the roof is steeper.  I would think that

> this angle would faciltate air flow up and out.  In contrast, a hoop

> structure might trap heat in the gentle curve of the roof.  Still, I

> would think some venting would be better than none. On the other hand,

> if simply replacing one end wall with screen is sufficient to equalize

> indoor and outdoor temperatures this may be a simpler solution.

>

>

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 13                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    Dave Miller 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 17:06:40 -0400

Thanks Jewel, I am a hand drummer and percussionist in a group I formed

called EarthMovers Drum Collective. We play out from time to time and

hold open drum circles. Lots of fun! That's a bit about me. How about

the passions and hobbies of others in the group???

Dave

 

_______________________________________

互户互户互户户互户



A remodeler, drummer, Kindred Spirit...

Put a pebble in your pocket and a penny in your shoe!

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 14                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 18:49:35 -0400

Speaking of percussion, has anybody seen Stomp?

> Thanks Jewel, I am a hand drummer and percussionist in a group I formed

> called EarthMovers Drum Collective.

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 15                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    PDOSSJR

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 19:24:39 EDT

In a message dated 10/27/99 2:14:00 PM Central Daylight Time, 

1mastiff@amigo.net writes:

<< Are you familar with the Absolite II batteries? >>

No, I'm sorry I'm not. I'm not running a 48v system though. That's a real 

hoss! I do have contact with many AE people, maybe I can find out something. 

What are you interested in knowing? I'm a Trojan man myself. 

Paul

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 16                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Bananas

From:    Peggy & Emmett Hoebel 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 19:54:14 -0400

Hey there bc.

All that has been said so far is true. In addition you might have a variety

that is grown for its foliage (you said they were pretty), its flower

..some strange ones, or there is one grown for its fiber, you know, to make

ropes. When I saw your messages I contacted a local banana expert (world

renowned) here in the Tampa area. Besides heavy feeding in the first three

months he suggested constant heavy feeding of potash (in aquaponics I guess

this would be banana skins in the blender) while keeping the N low.  Also

he suggested a variety known as Rajapuri.  I'll quote from his info:

Rajapuri- From India. It is probably the hardest and toughest of all bananas.

Six to eight feet tall, thick stem, medium size heads of sweet fruit. Produces

fruit in seven months and ripens in eight to ten weeks.  Very cold and wind

resistant. The one banana for the person who expects fruit with little effort.

The flower is eatable after cooking.

This last point is kinda weird, in all of my travels I've never met anyone

who has mentioned the delicious banana flower they ate.

Em

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 17                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: RE: Heirloom bananas

From:    "Ronald W. Brooks" 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 20:03:46 -0400

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0002_01BF20B6.60754CA0

Content-Type: text/plain;

        charset="iso-8859-1"

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Jewel

Almost all the eating type banana's are sterile. New varieties are produced

by mutation , not hybridization. The few varieties that do produce seed

produce inedible fruit 99% of the time.

But I pulled down my books on Banana production and found a variety that

seems to fill your description. It is called White Iholene. You can go to

http://www.stokestropicals.com

To see and order a pup ( vegetative division ) the cost in the catalog runs

around $19.95

Ron

  [Ron replies]  -----Original Message-----

  From: aquaponics

[mailto:aquaponics]On Behalf Of Jewel

  Sent: Tuesday, October 26, 1999 5:56 PM

  To: aquaponics mail group

  Subject: Heirloom bananas

  Does anyone know of a source of Heirloom or non-hybrid banana

seeds/seedlings?  We ate some in Belize once - very different - small,

orange, and sweet like a mango.

  Jewel

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 18                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 18:46:17 -0600

Stomp?

> Speaking of percussion, has anybody seen Stomp?

> > Thanks Jewel, I am a hand drummer and percussionist in a group I formed

> > called EarthMovers Drum Collective.

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 19                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 18:48:24 -0600

> hold open drum circles. Lots of fun! That's a bit about me. How about

> the passions and hobbies of others in the group???

> 

> Dave

>  

Music, more music, yoga, and non-random acts of kindness.

Jewel

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 20                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    Dave Miller 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 20:54:54 -0400

Stomp and Blue Man Group In Tube are faves!!!

-- 

_______________________________________

互户互户互户户互户



A remodeler, drummer, Kindred Spirit...

Put a pebble in your pocket and a penny in your shoe!

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 21                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta 

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 20:57:32 -0400

Stomp is a group of percussionists who use unconventional instruments

such as push-brooms, hub-caps and yes, even the kitchen sink to put on

an incredible show.  They have been touring nationally for the past

couple of years and are truly worth seeing.  (My apologies to the group

for this off-topic thread. Out of courtesy for the rest let's continue

it via e-mail if anybody's

interested.

Adriana                                                                    

Jewel wrote:

> 

> Stomp?

> 

> > Speaking of percussion, has anybody seen Stomp?

> > > Thanks Jewel, I am a hand drummer and percussionist in a group I formed

> > > called EarthMovers Drum Collective.

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 22                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 18:56:12 -0600

They just sound real good, and have a very long life span.  You can read

about them in the battery comparison chart of the Mr. Solar website.  It's

what we plan to go with for our system, so hopefully they're as good as they

sound.

> << Are you familar with the Absolite II batteries? >>

>

I'm a Trojan man myself.

>

Ribbed or plain?  Sorry, couldn't help myself.

> Paul

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 23                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 18:57:52 -0600

Oh, I forgot, do you know of any solar inflation blowers?

> hoss! I do have contact with many AE people, maybe I can find out

something.

> What are you interested in knowing? I'm a Trojan man myself.

>

> Paul

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 24                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

From:    "Jewel" <1mastiff@amigo.net>

Date:    Wed, 27 Oct 1999 19:01:47 -0600

We could bring it back in topic by forming our own group banging on tilapia

tanks, nutrient drums, growing beds.  Then seeing if it has any affect on

fish and plants!  Sorry, in a silly mood tonight.

----- Original Message -----

From: Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta 

To: 

Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 1999 6:57 PM

Subject: Re: Power Conservation

> Stomp is a group of percussionists who use unconventional instruments

> such as push-brooms, hub-caps and yes, even the kitchen sink to put on

> an incredible show.  They have been touring nationally for the past

> couple of years and are truly worth seeing.  (My apologies to the group

> for this off-topic thread. Out of courtesy for the rest let's continue

> it via e-mail if anybody's

> interested.

> Adriana

>

> Jewel wrote:

> >

> > Stomp?

> >

> > > Speaking of percussion, has anybody seen Stomp?

> > > > Thanks Jewel, I am a hand drummer and percussionist in a group I

formed

> > > > called EarthMovers Drum Collective.

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 25                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    PDOSSJR

Date:    Thu, 28 Oct 1999 00:15:29 EDT

In a message dated 10/27/99 7:55:48 PM Central Daylight Time, 

1mastiff@amigo.net writes:

Jewel,

<< Are you familar with the Absolite II batteries? >>

<< They just sound real good, and have a very long life span. >>

I have seen Mr. Solars website, but its been awhile. I know there are a lot 

of other good batteries out there, big old 2v deals, NiCad, NiFe, etc. They 

are just beyond my reach. With batteries it all boils down to cost per amp hr 

and life span. The Trojan L16 is a pretty good mix of the two.

As for your last comment, all I can say is. "mercy."

.------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------.

| Message 26                                                          |

'------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------'

Subject: Re: Inflation Fans, In or Out?

From:    PDOSSJR

Date:    Thu, 28 Oct 1999 00:45:51 EDT

In a message dated 10/27/99 7:57:13 PM Central Daylight Time, 

1mastiff@amigo.net writes:

<< Oh, I forgot, do you know of any solar inflation blowers? >>

I have heard of people using the small computer fans for similar projects. 

Cheap, lots of old 286's, 386's and 486's out there for scrap. They use very 

little energy, however it's x 24hr a day. You would have to step down your 

voltage. Probably other common things out there that could be used. The 

Surplus Center is a good source of motors, blowers, etc. They are at 

402-474-4055 for catalog. They show a 48v DC fan, 240 CFM, .46 amps. (that is 

still around 530 watts in 24 hrs.) for $8.99. They have the new muffin fans 

from $6-11. Not saying this would work for you, just an example.

There was some discussion about conservation. Remember those ghost loads, 

TV's, Microwaves, clocks, etc. that continue to use power even when not 

turned on. Connect them to wall switches where possible. It's a bummer to 

have to keep reprograming them though.

Paul

The scrounger.



Back to Index