Aquaponics Digest - Sat 10/30/99




Message   1: Re: Airy Business

             from "Sam Levy" 

Message   2: Plant biofilters

             from dreadlox@cwjamaica.com (michael kent barnett)

Message   3: Re: Best crops to try first

             from Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta

Message   4: Re:  Best Crops to Try First

             from "Charlie Shultz" 

Message   5: Snail Biocontrol - FYI

             from "Charlie Shultz" 

Message   6: carbon monoxide

             from khale@ballistic.com

Message   7: Re: Concrete...

             from "vpage" 

Message   8: Re: Concrete...

             from dreadlox@cwjamaica.com (michael kent barnett)

Message   9: Re: Aquaponics Digest - Fri  10/29/99

             from Gail Hall 

Message  10: Re: Concrete...

             from William Evans 

Message  11: Re: Concrete...

             from Borva

Message  12: Nitrite Poisoning

             from Marc & Marcy 

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| Message 1                                                           |

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Subject: Re: Airy Business

From:    "Sam Levy" 

Date:    Fri, 29 Oct 1999 22:30:00 PDT

mike-

in addition to the wheaton book which gordon recommended, you might also 

want to look at john colt's "computaion of dissolved gas concentrations in 

water as functions of temperature, salinity, & pressure" (afs special 

publication no. 14--1984), the title says it all.

you can use the SOTR & SAE information for comparing your options once you 

sized your system & decided on configuration (although paddlewheel aerators 

tend to be very efficient in power use, they also tend to be too large and 

bulky for use in tank culture).

in sizing keep in mind that you don't want to plan on a lower o2 level than 

75 - 80% of saturation (compare this figure with the demands of your culture 

species in absolute ppm requirements at the warmest culture water temp you 

expect).

also try to find literature on o2 demand per kg of food for your species 

(convert it to o2 demand per gram protein AND o2 demand per kcal of energy 

in order to check the reported value agains teh feed you will be using).

what will you need to provide the plants/biofilter? (if you plan to use a 

flood & drain type system, this calculation may be unnecessary as long as 

the greenhouse air remains rich in o2 through adequate exchange).

assuming that your makeup water has no o2, you'll have to provide for that 

also.

you'll also have to consider your back up system which should include spare 

capacity (extra blower for example), spare parts, substitute electricity or 

supplemental oxygen (pure) w/ a delivery system.

hope this is more helpful than confusing.

sam

>From: dreadlox@cwjamaica.com (michael kent barnett)

>

>Subject: Airy Business

>Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 01:26:40 +0100

>

>

>

>However, does anyone on the list know how or where I can get a table

>which correlates all these inputs? In other words, how much of that air

>at that temp, and pressure pumped out into my fish tanks at "x" depth

>will actually be "usable" breathable oxygen by the fish? In other words,

>CFM/temp/given depth ==> what SOTR? (see blow for SOTR def'n. )

>I would expect this to give me the SOTR which "is the amount of oxygen

>that an aerator will transfer in 1 hour to clear freshwater at 20C

>which contains zero (0) mg/I DO."

>

>

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| Message 2                                                           |

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Subject: Plant biofilters

From:    dreadlox@cwjamaica.com (michael kent barnett)

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 08:11:58 -0700

Ron Polka wrote..

 If you

> are interested in general biofilter sizing procedures I also files relating

> to that from several sources in addition to a specific biofilter design for

> watercress. If you want that info drop me line. Good luck with your system.

> 

Thanks for the replies on my Air question, to thise that came and are

coming!!

Im interested in all the info I can get on biofilters... please share

this info with me.I am currently sizing one for a fish farm but info is

very varied...

Id love t know how it did for you..

Mike

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| Message 3                                                           |

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Subject: Re: Best crops to try first

From:    Adriana Gutierrez & Dennis LaGatta 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 07:09:54 -0400

Marlan and Tom,

The easiest crops to grow are basil and salad greens.  They are fast

crops that can be grown in high density to maximize yields.  For

start-up purposes I would recommend that you begin with Johnny's All

Lettuce MIx and All Greens Mix.  The lettuce and greens mixes are in the

section called Salad and Braising Mixes, pg 28 of the commercial

catalog.  All Lettuce Mix is #2082, All Greens Mix #2083.  A one ounce

package of each will be sufficient for a number of seedings.   These can

be grown as "cut and come again" crops.  You seed, then cut when they

are about 3-4" tall.  It will grow back again and be ready to cut in 1-2

weeks, depending on your light.  You can usually get 2-3 cuttings before

you need to re-seed.  

When you mix the greens with the lettuces you get "Mesclun", "Spring

Mix" or "Field Greens".  Since the lettuces take about 28 days to

harvest and the greens 21 you'll need to seed the lettuces one week

earlier.

Once you try the mixed seed, decide which of the component greens you

like.  After the initial trial then I would suggest you order the

individual seeds and grow each separately.  This keeps the tall plants

from shading and crowdiing out the shorter ones.  If you plan to grow

salad mix for commercial production, COLOR is critical.  You need LOTS

of red in your mix.  Be sure to take a good look at the California mixes

on the market as this is your competition.  Chefs may buy once because

they love the freshness but they will become disillusioned if it doesn't

look as gorgeous as the California stuff.

You can make more money selling individual greens like Tatsoi, Mizuna,

etc. but you have to get your foot in the door to establish a

relationship with the chefs.  As some wise people on this list have told

me "this business is not about food, it's about passion."  You have to

find those chefs who are passionate about the quality and don't view

your product as another commodity (that's what Sysco is for).

Adriana

> < first in an auquaponic setup please let me know.  I am located in Virginia .

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| Message 4                                                           |

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Subject: Re:  Best Crops to Try First

From:    "Charlie Shultz" 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 04:54:36 PDT

Marlan,

Assuming your crops will be indoors (greenhouse) this winter in Virginia, I 

would start with lettuce and maybe herbs like basil or mints.  You could 

also plant flowers like marigolds or zinnia to add colors to the greenhouse.

All these crops mentioned seem to thrive in aquaponic water.

Good luck.  Could you tell us what part of Virginia you are located.  I'll 

be traveling there next month.

Best of Luck,

Charlie

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| Message 5                                                           |

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Subject: Snail Biocontrol - FYI

From:    "Charlie Shultz" 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 05:02:27 PDT

Hey Gang,

Recently here at UVI, we've had an influx of snails to our aquaponic 

systems.  The little guys colonize the underside of our floating rafts and 

"graze" off our beneficial bacteria (nitrifiers).

A Biocontrol had to be found.

We decide to try introducing a fish called the Redear sunfish ("pumpkinseed" 

or "shellcracker") to the hydroponic troughs, under the lettuce roots.  If 

we added tilapia fry, they would probably finish off all the lettuce roots 

before even tasting the first snail.

Anyhow,  after introducing 5 small fish (10g) the snails had dissappeared 

within 4-5 days.  Next I introduced 2 fish/trough and within 1 week even one 

snail was had to find.

Our prelininary results indicate these fish can be use successfully for 

snail control in our systems.  As the snail supply dwindles, I will probably 

have to remove the Redears from the troughs.  Otherwise, they may go for our 

roots next.

More results as they develop,

Charlie

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| Message 6                                                           |

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Subject: carbon monoxide

From:    khale@ballistic.com

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 09:37:39 -0500

I know that plants feed on carbon dioxide but what about carbon monoxide

(gas coming out of the vent pipes)?      Ken

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| Message 7                                                           |

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Subject: Re: Concrete...

From:    "vpage" 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 11:13:24 -0600

I also!

VPage

----- Original Message -----

From: Jennifer Maynard 

To: 

Sent: Friday, October 29, 1999 8:25 AM

Subject: Re: Concrete...

> I would be interested.

>

> Jennifer

> maynard4@candw.ag

>

> Jon Hays wrote:

> >

> > I would be very interested.

> > John Hays

> >

> > At 06:27 PM 10/28/1999 , you wrote:

> > >Hi guys...

> > >

> > >My queries have lead me to the range of latex polymer concrete

> > >modifiers!! I will soon be trying this out... and will post the reslts

> > >if anyones interested. It is waterproof and water is safe fr fish and

> > >pools ponds water storage..

> > >

> > >MIke, the concrete putterer...

> > >

> > >

> > >Brian Gracia wrote:

> > > >

> > > > Hello,

> > > >

> > > > I would use a coat of fibreglass resin made for water contact to

line the

> > > > tank.  Bitumen, which is a tar based paint can be used.  I have

search high

> > > > and low for other applications, but what I found was that non of the

> > > > products were safe for potable water use.

> > > >

> > > > Brian

> > > >

> > > > At 08:55 AM 9/19/99 , you wrote:

> > > > >This is not the liquid liner stuff, this is actually an additive to

> > > > >chemically modify the concrete!!

> > > > >

> > > > ********************************************

> > > > Better Produce through Better Control

> > > > ********************************************

> >

> > John Hays

> > 1903 Pebble Hill Rd.

> > Carlsbad, NM  88220

> > 1-505-887-0102

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| Message 8                                                           |

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Subject: Re: Concrete...

From:    dreadlox@cwjamaica.com (michael kent barnett)

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 21:20:49 -0700

ok GANG,

To get you started, there a latex acrylic compounds that are sold in a

chemical paste that one adds to concrete that will highly improve wear,

cause waterproofing qualities to increase dramatically etc. Tey react

wit the concrete to cause the (in my case, premixed concrete) to become

a smooth easy spreadable paste. It ca be slightly diluted with water to

improve levelling capacity or for filling cracks or seams.

I will be getting the qoute and sample next week, and we will under

favourable conditions be the guineapig for te importer.

It is the same family of products as the 2 component compounds used for

the smooth flooring you see sometimes in large halls and shopping

centres etc.

It should be quite easy to find in N. America. we have just gotte our

first importer here in the island. For those of you subscribed to

greenbuilding at CREST, you should be able to get more info.

I believe Jim Sealy on this group helped the person who helped me on

another group, who had helped someone in Santo Domingo too...

small world.......  Comments Jim?

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| Message 9                                                           |

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Subject: Re: Aquaponics Digest - Fri  10/29/99

From:    Gail Hall 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 13:11:20 -0700

Dear List Keeper:

I suggest each issue of this  list end with something like this:

You are currently subscribed to special-offers as: 

[ghall@tendergreens.com]

To unsubscribe, send email to 

leave-special-offers-98596035U@mail.southwest.com

or unsubscribe anytime at http://www.southwest.com/email 

People need to unsubscribe and resubscribe when they change their e-mail 

address, as I just did this week. There are many reasons for coming on 

and off the list. It would be helpful to make that easy to do.

Gail Hall, Tender Greens

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| Message 10                                                          |

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Subject: Re: Concrete...

From:    William Evans 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 13:47:46 -0700

michael kent barnett wrote:

> 

> ok GANG,

> To get you started, there a latex acrylic compounds that are sold in a

> chemical paste that one adds to concrete that will highly improve wear,

> cause waterproofing qualities to increase dramatically etc.

  I think  in addition to this one can add extra cement to the mix to

decrease water absorbtion/permability.Cant advise on the exact ratios...

but am pretty sure that is all that is required to make virtually

waterproof.

billevans

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Subject: Re: Concrete...

From:    Borva

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 17:34:39 EDT

Here we have a small source on the subject of concrete and water holding 

structures

http://www.ferrocement.net/#On-line Intro

Enjoy,

Ed

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| Message 12                                                          |

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Subject: Nitrite Poisoning

From:    Marc & Marcy 

Date:    Sat, 30 Oct 1999 20:24:41 -0600

I found the following website and it contained a section on

nitrite poisoning. I thought this may be relevant due to the

possibility of high nitrate levels in the avarious

configurations in aquaponics.

The section is found under "Classification of Poisons",

"3.Nitrate poisoning...."

http://www.gov.on.ca/OMAFRA/english/livestock/dairy/facts/87-016.htm

Marc



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