Aquaponics Digest - Fri 08/17/01



Message   1: Hydroponic Information, and  even cheap ozone generators
             from kris book 

Message   2: greenhouse question
             from "gutierrez-lagatta" 

Message   3: Re: vortex filters / hydrocyclones
             from "Leslie Ter Morshuizen" 

Message   4: RE: Hydroponic Information, and  even cheap ozone generators
             from "Mark Allen Wells" 

Message   5: Give a man a fish.             from "Mark Allen Wells" 

Message   6: Re: Ever tasted gar or bowfin?
             from "Robert Rogers" 

Message   7: Re: greenhouse question
             from "Jay Myers" 

Message   8: Gar
             from Roy Houston 

Message   9: Re: Give a man a fish.             from Mick 

Message  10: Re: Give a man a fish.             from "gerry magnuson" 

Message  11: 
             from "Benjamin Ybarra" 

Message  12: Market Trend
             from Mick 

Message  13: Re: Gar
             from "Robert Rogers" 

.         .
| Message 1                                                           

Subject: Hydroponic Information, and  even cheap ozone generators
From:    kris book 
Date:    Thu, 16 Aug 2001 23:54:55 -0600

Steve Hurst,

I still can't find any info on which veggies clone the best but, this
indoor marijuana growers web site has an abundance of useful information
on hydroponic plant deficiencies, cloning techniques, and even a good
site for ozone generators.

http://www.hydroponicsbc.com/home.html

http://www.hydroponicsbc.com/hydroponics.html

.         .
| Message 2                                                           

Subject: greenhouse question
From:    "gutierrez-lagatta" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 01:29:17 -0500

I will be covering a 3000 sq ft greenhouse in the next couple of
weeks.  Does anybody have any strong opinions on the use of Agri-Lock
vs. "wiggle wire" to attach the plastic to the frame?

Cost is about the same for both.

Adriana

.         .
| Message 3                                                           

Subject: Re: vortex filters / hydrocyclones
From:    "Leslie Ter Morshuizen" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 09:16:59 +0200

Hi Carolyn

Vortex filters are used in recirculating systems for removing particles
prior to the biofilters.  Due to the circular water motion created by the
water entering the cone, particles tend to collect in the bottom centre
through centripetal force (i.e. spin in).  Particles having a lower specific
gravity than water are removed fairly effectively, but slightly heavier
particles tend to remain in suspension and must be removed mechanically.  An
upstand pipe or tap can be used to drain the concerntrate off at regular
intervals.

Leslie

> Could something like this reduce the amount of water going to a
> settling tank?  You would only have to settle the discharge of the
> hydrocyclone?  Do fish solids weigh enough to be "spun out" or
> centrifuged?  How about suspended solids like algae, zooplankton,
> etc
 some of those suspended floating things must have a specific
> gravity pretty close to that of water?

.         .
| Message 4                                                           

Subject: RE: Hydroponic Information, and  even cheap ozone generators
From:    "Mark Allen Wells" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 04:41:36 -0500

I still can't find any info on which veggies clone the best but, this
indoor marijuana growers web site has an abundance of useful information
on hydroponic plant deficiencies, cloning techniques, and even a good
site for ozone generators.

http://www.hydroponicsbc.com/home.html

http://www.hydroponicsbc.com/hydroponics.html

Hi kris
.good to see your name on the list
.I thought you may have 
wrecked your semi again
.LOL.

Ya gotta hand it to those pot growers
.they figured out a lot 
of things for hydro growers in general.  It takes me back to 1978.I can hear my mom saying
."mark
.what are those plants in that
tub in the garage???"
.LOL.

*feeling nostalgic
.looking for my Bob Seger cd
.LOL.*
peace,
mark

.         .
| Message 5                                                           

Subject: Give a man a fish.From:    "Mark Allen Wells" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 05:30:32 -0500

"Give a man a fish and you have fed him for a day.
Teach a man to fish and you have fed him for a lifetime".

                                 ancient chinese proverb

For some reason, as I was setting up my 90 gallon tank in
my living room tonight, this proverb entered my mind and
then went much deeper.  I thought about what Mick said
about us being pioneers.  I thought about my grandfather
and how he would have been so fascinated by this new form
of agriculture. To be able to one day empower others with 
what we are learning here is a great feeling.  I think God
put that proverb in my mind tonight
.I think He wants me
to spread the word about what we are doing here.

If this isn't what happened then maybe I spent too much time
in my garage with my "plants" when I was younger
.LOL> just
kidding.  I'm very thankful to have found this list and all the
great people that make it happen.

mark

.         .
| Message 6                                                           

Subject: Re: Ever tasted gar or bowfin?
From:    "Robert Rogers" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 07:17:29 -0400

Never eaten Bowfin, Gar are great, but hard to clean. The best way is to cut
down the belly with a pair of aircraft snips then use your hands to seperate
the flesh from the skin, then treat them like any other fish. They sell gar
in markets in Louisiana
                            Bob
----- Original Message -----
From: "Carolyn Hoagland" 

Sent: Friday, August 17, 2001 12:30 AM
Subject: Ever tasted gar or bowfin?

> I was looking through a book on freshwater fish and noticed that both
> of these can do well in "poorly oxygenated waters."  I'm looking for
> some species native to the US to stock at low density in some small
> ponds.
>
> Fish base lists them as a gamefish.
>
> Bowfin  (also called dogfish)  here is a good picture:
> http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/conn.river/bowfin.html
> Amia clava     Family: Amiidae
> ---
> Unlike most of the other fish, Amia's swim bladder functions much like
> a lung, allowing this fish to gulp air when dissolved oxygen levels
> become dangerously low in the weed beds where it lives.  A voracious
> and opportunist feeder, it subsists on fishes including other
> sportfishes, frogs, crayfish, insects, shrimps, large amounts of
> vegetation.
>
> *large amounts of vegetation*? (Hmmmm
.)
>
>  Climate: temperate; 15 - 20C
>
>
> Gars, longnose, shortnose, spotted   family: Lepisosteidae
> http://ngp.ngpc.state.ne.us/fish/fishbook/spec040.html
> --
> Occur in sluggish pools, backwaters and oxbows of medium to large
> rivers, and lakes. Usually found near vegetation. Gar habitually lie
> motionless near the surface, looking much like a log or a stick, and
> move only to feed or to take air from the surface. A specially adapted
> pharynx and air bladder make the gar one of only a few fish able to
> "breathe" air.  A voracious predator, feeding on various fishes and
> crustaceans.
>
> Climate: temperate; 12 - 20C
>
> So, how do they taste?  (and are the fillets boneless?) As a kid, if
> we caught a gar, we always "threw them back" (into the water).  My Dad
> didn't like them, so I never tasted one

>
> Thanks,
> Carolyn

.         .
| Message 7                                                           

Subject: Re: greenhouse question
From:    "Jay Myers" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 08:05:42 -0500

I only have experience with wiggle wire, but I can say it is easy, and if
you want to adjust, it's easy to do.
Jay
Panama City Beach, Fl.

> I will be covering a 3000 sq ft greenhouse in the next couple of
> weeks.  Does anybody have any strong opinions on the use of Agri-Lock
> vs. "wiggle wire" to attach the plastic to the frame?
>
> Cost is about the same for both.
>
> Adriana
>

.         .
| Message 8                                                           

Subject: Gar
From:    Roy Houston 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 08:35:23 -0500

Carolyn:

I would basically forget gar.  The reason your dad threw them back is that
they are full of bones
. lots and lots of hair like bones.  Taste is pretty
unspectacular also.

Around here (northern MS) most people don't throw them back, but rather
shove the nose into the sand or rocks so that they will die.  One less bait
stealer they claim.

As far as growth, they do grow enormous.  About once a year somebody will
catch one around here that is 5-6 feet long.  Pretty prehistoric looking
fish if you ask me.
Roy

>So, how do they taste?  (and are the fillets boneless?) As a kid, if
>we caught a gar, we always "threw them back" (into the water).  My Dad
>didn't like them, so I never tasted one

.         .
| Message 9                                                           

Subject: Re: Give a man a fish.From:    Mick 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 13:09:58 -0500

Mark Allen Wells wrote:

> "Give a man a fish and you have fed him for a day.
> Teach a man to fish and you have fed him for a lifetime".
>
>                                  ancient chinese proverb
>
> Mark, boyo
 ya made me smile.  That's saying a lot, considering  I'm
> having a "challenging" sorta day.  That message made it all better

> 

If any of you pioneers need a 'coon-skin Davy Crockett hat, I might be
able to oblige if I can get the raccoons to hold still long enough.

Mick

.         .
| Message 10                                                          

Subject: Re: Give a man a fish.From:    "gerry magnuson" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 08:10:19 -1000

teach a man to fish
.and beer sales go up

>From: Mick 
>Reply-To: aquaponics 'at' townsqr.com
>To: aquaponics 'at' townsqr.com
>Subject: Re: Give a man a fish.>Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 13:09:58 -0500
>
>
>
>Mark Allen Wells wrote:
>
> > "Give a man a fish and you have fed him for a day.
> > Teach a man to fish and you have fed him for a lifetime".
> >
> >                                  ancient chinese proverb
> >
> > Mark, boyo
 ya made me smile.  That's saying a lot, considering  I'm
> > having a "challenging" sorta day.  That message made it all better

> > 
>
>If any of you pioneers need a 'coon-skin Davy Crockett hat, I might be
>able to oblige if I can get the raccoons to hold still long enough.
>
>Mick
>
>

 

.         .
| Message 11                                                          

Subject: 
From:    "Benjamin Ybarra" 
Date:    Fri, 17 Aug 2001 13:27:44 -0500

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

how do I stop
 getting all these emails

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how do I stop
 getting all these=20 emails
=_NextPart_000_00E9_01C12720.660DC620-- . . | Message 12 Subject: Market Trend From: Mick Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 13:32:06 -0500 In our local market that sells organically raised food, many of the food producers are labelling their products as containing no genetically altered foods. They are referring to gene manipulation and not cross-breeding. Currently, there is no regulation requiring food packaging to contain info about genetically altered ingredients. But, a growing number of consumers are looking for unaltered food. How does this apply to us, you're probably asking . Remember the news stories about the genetically altered corn, Starlink (sp?), that somehow made its way into 250 different food products before the FDA had approved it? The corn contained an extra protein that humans hadn't been exposed to. Many folks had violent allergic reactions to the corn. Might be a good idea to harvest and help "heritage" some seeds of strains that we know work well in this system. For one thing, it's another marketing tool, and you can advertise your produce as coming from unaltered stock. For another thing, it helps keep the strain untainted with altered cross-breeds. Just a thought, Mick . . | Message 13 Subject: Re: Gar From: "Robert Rogers" Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2001 19:21:17 -0400 I disagree, have you tried them yourself, no "Y "bones no "hair" bones, this is personal experiance. My Father threw them back too, but had never eaten one, I have. Please try things for yourself ----- Original Message ----- From: "Roy Houston" To: "Aquaponics List" Sent: Friday, August 17, 2001 9:35 AM Subject: Gar > Carolyn: > > I would basically forget gar. The reason your dad threw them back is that > they are full of bones . lots and lots of hair like bones. Taste is pretty > unspectacular also. > > Around here (northern MS) most people don't throw them back, but rather > shove the nose into the sand or rocks so that they will die. One less bait > stealer they claim. > > As far as growth, they do grow enormous. About once a year somebody will > catch one around here that is 5-6 feet long. Pretty prehistoric looking > fish if you ask me.> > Roy > > > >So, how do they taste? (and are the fillets boneless?) As a kid, if > >we caught a gar, we always "threw them back" (into the water). My Dad > >didn't like them, so I never tasted one >

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